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to be worse than the private markets. in contrast in a speech in california in may, and it romney's said "the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time
that we have over the past five years. in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores from the ranch partners in the field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government puts half a billion into one of its choice? excellent question. i wrote this book because were not just spending half a billion. we are spending $12 billion year-to-date electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that's about six elion and tax breaks and 6 billion in direct expenditures. we are pursuing a vision of green jobs that makes no sense and has low income americans. we brainwash our children to think green is good and think uncritically about green products and green jobs. yet we can't even define what a green job aids. let's start with green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs is calculated, namely energy from renewable sources, energy effici
, asking to be incorporated into the union. i think the hope was akin to a california had done, establish sovereign state and have u.s. government take it as a done deed and skip territorial status. they send one petitioned asking to be admitted to territory and covered the implications of territorial rule inside a second petition asking for admittance to this day. i was ultimately is wary admitting for a number of reasons, including the small population. so ultimately it ends up in the utah territory. >> next question. over here with the mike, please. thank you. >> i am wondering -- i just finished reading the book this morning. it's brilliant. i wonder if you could tell us a little bit more about the united order and in particular there is some comments at some point in the boat on brigham young's attitude with respect to capitalism. could you expand on that further? >> scheuer. well, he's a little hard to pin down on capitalism mainly because his foremost concern is not allowing outside capitalists to have too much power over developments in utah. he's very much much in favor of promot
, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from the state on the sun belt. when johnson from texas, richard nixon from california. gerald ford was never elected, so he doesn't count. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california. the first george bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. they didn't have a conservative cast of them. they tended to be oriented about issues of strong national defense, and opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also is in the south and sou
. why did he move to california? what were his parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so father was the son of irish immigrant and he had traveled around as an itinerant without a lot of different things. he was kind of talk to her about the adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child, ended up staying and eventually married a man named vendor. they moved up to test your mother said it was? i think north dakota and he was killed in a flood of fire. actually, i chide very hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, spoke to the archivist and really could not find a tremendous amount of information about her mother sirs has been. from that marriage, she did have two children and then she married will ryan and the move to nevada. they make to several dilettantes in nevada and he was a minor. but she has lost one has been to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
experiment." he said, "i'm going to call you." and he was on his way to california. so he said, "i'm going to call you from california at your home, and i'm going to tell you that i'm going to come out endorsing ross perot for the presidency." c-span: and he thought that the bush administration was afraid of this? >> guest: yes. yes. actually, both sides might think, "well, what was going on with richard nixon if he's endorsing ross perot?" so he said, "i'm going to tell you that i'm endorsing ross perot. i want you to keep a straight face and a straight voice. don't let on to anything." and he said, "we're going to set this person up if, in fact, there are wiretaps on my phone." so he flew to california, he called me, we went through this little episode, and then nothing ever came of it. so either his phones weren't tapped or nobody thought enough of it to leak it. but it was just one of his little experiments. c-span: hugh sidey came to visit on day, the former time magazine journalist. i -- maybe he's still -- i think he might still write for them sometimes. he had a column on the presi
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
be curious to know a little bit about her family, in nevada. what did her father do, why move to california? what were his parents like, what were her mother's parents like? >> we're getting into a tricky area. her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had to travel around -- she did a lot of things. he would talk about his good ventures. he had been made minor. term mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child and stayed and eventually married a man named bender. we move to what the code did we decide it was? north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, i spoke to the archivist and could not find a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she had two children. than she married will ryan and they moved to nevada, several towns in nevada and he was a minor. she lost one husband to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
that about her family, born in nevada? what did her father do there? why did he move to california? what were his parents like, her mother's parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so, her father was the son of irish immigrants, and he had traveled around as an itinerant, he done a lot of different things to get it on a merchant ship. he would talk to her about his adventures, and he had been a minor. her mother was a first generation german immigrant, and her mother had been married before. her mother was, her mother came over as a child within and, ended up staying and eventually, eventually married a man named bender. they moved up to what dakota did was decide it was? was? ivory coast north dakota. moved up to north dakota, and he was killed in a flight up there. now, actually i tried very hard to find information about the floods that killed him. i called the archives. i called, spoke to the archivist and really could not find commit is a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she did have two children. and then they moved, then she m
move to california? what were his parents late, her mother's parents late? >> okay, now we are getting into a tricky area. so her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had traveled around sn -- she had done a lot of different things. he would kind of talk to her about these adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and hermit there had been very before. her mother came over as a child with an aunt, up staying and eventually married a man named ender. they moved up to, what decoded to recite it was? i think is north dakota. the debt to north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried very hard to find permission about the flood that killed him. i called the archives. i spoke to the archivist and really could not find a tremendous amount of information about her mother's first test in. from that marriage, she did have two children. then she married will o'bryan and they moved to nevada. actually so the little towns in nevada and he was a minor. but she had lost one has been to miami in she did not want to lose another
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
communities. in vermont we have town meetings and they work incredibly well here but in california that is not a decision and their decisions people can build on. if they can say okay well, in order to be really a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberate advantage to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework to people to say, look, here is how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town meetings and apples like they do in vermont. we can have oranges are some or some other process so people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibility to rise up locally and hopefully i think in some ways i can have an impact on the national conversation.
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)